Traditional recipes

Chef David Burke’s Take on Asparagus — 5 Different Ways

Chef David Burke’s Take on Asparagus — 5 Different Ways

The chef experiments with his favorite vegetable with 5 new and unique ways

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Forever experimenting with asparagus, the chef even puts it in his cookies.

Ever since I studied in culinary school, I have loved to experiment with asparagus. Asparagus and spinach butter was always my favorite thing to make. The sweetness and grassiness of the asparagus is so elegant and makes it a great ingredient to play around with. Its beautiful green skin and pointed tip make it a great tool for plating, too. Here are some of my favorite ways to prepare it.

Asparagus Vinaigrette

Asparagus vinaigrette is like a lighter version of pesto without all of the Parmesan. Blend cooked asparagus with olive oil and your favorite type of acid, whether it be lemon juice, balsamic vinegar, or a red-wine vinegar.

Tempura Asparagus

Asparagus tastes great tempura-fried, so try your favorite tempura batter the next time you have a few stalks on hand and serve it alongside soy sauce and duck sauce.

Asparagus Risotto

Asparagus risotto is easy to make: just use the broth you blanched the asparagus in with your favorite risotto recipe.

An Asparagus Raft

This is my favorite way to plate with asparagus. I’ll basket-weave cooked stalks together to make a "raft," and plate the protein of the dish on top.

"Sad" Tomato and Asparagus Salad

There’s nothing sad about this recipe, but it got its name because of the hollowed out tomato. I stuff it with ricotta and asparagus for a new twist on presenting a salad.

Asparagus Cookies

That’s right; I even like making cookies with asparagus. The recipe is easy, and I recommend enjoying them that day.

Click here to see the Asparagus Cookies Recipe


Chef David Burke Dishes on Healthy Cooking

Continuing with our series of top chefs "Dish With Diane" on healthy eating, I chatted with David Burke.

David and I are friends and have cooked together both on television and live on stage. In addition to being a great guy and amazing chef, he is generous with sharing his wealth of culinary knowledge and how lucky am I to have his brain to pick? David is a pioneer of modern American cooking. In the mid-1980s, he brought new techniques and new styles of food to the table at the River Café in New York City. He was one of the first chefs, if not the first chef, to brand and trademark his own food: "I didn't just put my name on a box of pasta I invented what's in the box."

Pastrami salmon and cheesecake pops are his signature creations. David has also taken dry aging to a new level with a technique that is proprietary to him and recognized as a better way to do it that produces a healthier and more flavorful end product. David Burke has been a trailblazer following and setting trends that have been integral in creating what we now call Modern American Cuisine.

Let's get David's take on healthy cooking and eating:

Diane: Do you see a trend with diners seeking better-for-you options on the menu?

David: Yes, healthier but not boring. They are not looking for "plate fillers" like French fries they are looking for exciting, sensible food using grains, fish and seasonal vegetables. Starch does not have to automatically be included on a plate, those days are over. Restaurant customers today are requesting kicked up versions of veggies and fruits in place of starch and chefs need to be ready for that. What I feel is very important is to have a wait staff that knows the menu inside out and can steer customers who want healthier options in the right direction.

Diane: What's your definition of "healthy eating"?

David: Sensible eating and balanced diet with not too much fat, bread, beef or sugar. There is nothing wrong with chocolate mousse, you just don't eat it every day. It's important to educate yourself about what foods are good for you. Try picking 20 things you really like and make salads out of them … pears, cheese, walnuts, beef jerky, whatever - it's a good way to get started. I am working right now to get myself healthier and have lost 20 pounds by reducing portions, carbohydrates and just being more conscious of what I eat because I want to get ready for the next 50 years of my life.

Diane: What is your secret to cooking healthier without sacrificing flavor?

David: The key is using quality ingredients. I use broths, herbs, spices, zests, juices, marinades and limited fats. Try cooking techniques that caramelizes the natural sugar in foods like grilling and searing. This adds flavor without extra calories or fat. Poaching and steaming are healthy ways to cook but can produce a bland result so you need added ingredients like herbs, spices, coffee, tea, vegetable juices, chilies or vanilla to boost the flavor.

Diane: What is your favorite dish on your own menu?

David: My Pastrami Salmon. I love it because it's versatile, convenient, tasty, smoky, rich and spicy. I feel good eating it. I add it to egg whites, wrap it in lettuce leaves, toss with pasta or use as a garnish. It's on the menu of all of my restaurants.

Diane: How about an update on what's new and exciting in your world?


INTRODUCING THE DAVID BURKE COLLECTION

I am excited to announce I have partnered with Frieling USA, a leading purveyor of cookware, bakeware and more, to create a curated selection of items we have called “The David Burke Collection.”

I have always wanted to offer a signature line of cookware and utensils that represents exactly what I use in my restaurant kitchens. Everything you will see in my signature line is professional grade and battle tested in my kitchens by myself and my team of executive chefs. I guarantee every item will meet the highest standard of professional integrity. If you are stepping up your game in the kitchen, you have come to the right place!

Team #CHEWDOIN and I are working on some special recipes we will share so you can show off your skills with your new cookware. There is also a nice selection of items to bring your next dinner party up a notch or two. Check out the wine glasses, French Press, and charcuterie boards – just to name a few! Bon appétit!


Chef David Burke Dishes on Healthy Cooking

Continuing with our series of top chefs "Dish With Diane" on healthy eating, I chatted with David Burke.

David and I are friends and have cooked together both on television and live on stage. In addition to being a great guy and amazing chef, he is generous with sharing his wealth of culinary knowledge and how lucky am I to have his brain to pick? David is a pioneer of modern American cooking. In the mid-1980s, he brought new techniques and new styles of food to the table at the River Café in New York City. He was one of the first chefs, if not the first chef, to brand and trademark his own food: "I didn't just put my name on a box of pasta I invented what's in the box."

Pastrami salmon and cheesecake pops are his signature creations. David has also taken dry aging to a new level with a technique that is proprietary to him and recognized as a better way to do it that produces a healthier and more flavorful end product. David Burke has been a trailblazer following and setting trends that have been integral in creating what we now call Modern American Cuisine.

Let's get David's take on healthy cooking and eating:

Diane: Do you see a trend with diners seeking better-for-you options on the menu?

David: Yes, healthier but not boring. They are not looking for "plate fillers" like French fries they are looking for exciting, sensible food using grains, fish and seasonal vegetables. Starch does not have to automatically be included on a plate, those days are over. Restaurant customers today are requesting kicked up versions of veggies and fruits in place of starch and chefs need to be ready for that. What I feel is very important is to have a wait staff that knows the menu inside out and can steer customers who want healthier options in the right direction.

Diane: What's your definition of "healthy eating"?

David: Sensible eating and balanced diet with not too much fat, bread, beef or sugar. There is nothing wrong with chocolate mousse, you just don't eat it every day. It's important to educate yourself about what foods are good for you. Try picking 20 things you really like and make salads out of them … pears, cheese, walnuts, beef jerky, whatever - it's a good way to get started. I am working right now to get myself healthier and have lost 20 pounds by reducing portions, carbohydrates and just being more conscious of what I eat because I want to get ready for the next 50 years of my life.

Diane: What is your secret to cooking healthier without sacrificing flavor?

David: The key is using quality ingredients. I use broths, herbs, spices, zests, juices, marinades and limited fats. Try cooking techniques that caramelizes the natural sugar in foods like grilling and searing. This adds flavor without extra calories or fat. Poaching and steaming are healthy ways to cook but can produce a bland result so you need added ingredients like herbs, spices, coffee, tea, vegetable juices, chilies or vanilla to boost the flavor.

Diane: What is your favorite dish on your own menu?

David: My Pastrami Salmon. I love it because it's versatile, convenient, tasty, smoky, rich and spicy. I feel good eating it. I add it to egg whites, wrap it in lettuce leaves, toss with pasta or use as a garnish. It's on the menu of all of my restaurants.

Diane: How about an update on what's new and exciting in your world?


Chef David Burke’s Take on Asparagus — 5 Different Ways - Recipes

When I think about cooking with kids, I think about what recipes or menus I can create that will involve them in every step of the process. One of my favorite things to do with kids is to give them a bunch of ingredients and the instructions, and let them go crazy without telling them what the end result should be. It gets them excited about cooking and adds an element of surprise to the whole process. Here are some ideas and recipes that will help you get the kids involved in the kitchen more often.

Spinach
Kids are usually averse to spinach because they've probably only tried it cooked, which has a very strong flavor. A handful of fresh spinach has a much milder flavor that they might enjoy, and is richer in nutrients than regular iceberg lettuce. Try swapping the two next time you're serving a salad or making a sandwich — I'm sure you'll be surprised at how much they like it.

Tomato Soup Recipe
This recipe is great for kids because it has simple ingredients and very little process.

Steamed Fruit Recipe
This is the best way to give kids what they want but also give them something that is good for them.

Ham and Cheese Ravioli
We all know kids love ravioli and ham and cheese sandwiches. This recipe lets them enjoy both, and the assembly makes it fun for them to make.

Chicken Fingers Recipe
People always love this recipe because they don't usually think of using the skin this way when cooking a piece of chicken. It adds a perfect, crunchy texture, and you won't want to eat a chicken wrap any other way again. Kids also have a lot of fun shaking the bag when seasoning the chicken.

'Lunch-to-Go' Lunchbox
I love this recipe because it allows the kids to have the freedom to create what they like but it's also good for them. They'll be so excited about creating a lunch with the ingredients that they'll forget that there are even green beans in there. I also like to get creative with how I package the lunches. Tennis ball sleeves make the perfect lunchbox for a wrap, and sometimes I'll even pack a lunch in a paint can, which serves two purposes: keeps the lunch from getting ruined and gives the kids an opportunity to decorate their lunchbox.


S’Chee – Russian Cabbage Soup S’Chee (I’ve been pronouncing this “Shay” my whole life and was just corrected by a nice reader who said it’s actually “Shchee”) is a very traditional Russian cabbage soup. The recipes vary and have been passed from family to family in different regions for generations. This is the recipe my family has used for decades (and no we aren’t Russian.

This mushroom croustades recipe is great when you’re throwing a party. They are always such a bit hit… and any leftover duxelle (fancy name for mushroom filling) may be used as a delicious topping for potatoes, eggs or on top of a filet mignon. The “cups” which are often referred to as “croustades” in other recipes and are little bread cases made with round slices of soft white bread that are pressed into.


Champagne Strawberry Banana Ice Cream "Sundae"

Ingredients:

For the Cake

Cream together the butter and sugar

Add eggs, vanilla and zest, mix together

bake 325 for 30mins or until a toothpick comes out clean

1 pint strawberries, sliced

mix together strawberries, champagne or orange juice and sugar to macerate

To assemble:

Place piece of cake on a plate or small bowl. Top with strawberries. Top with ice cream. Add additional desired toppings -- whipped cream, chopped nuts, chocolate sauce, etc.


Culinary king David Burke shares brunch recipes

Brunch is the Best of both worlds. Whether you’re in the mood for sweet or savory.

Tavern 62 by David Burke s a new eatery on the Upper East Side that serves it all up.

This morning the culinary king, is here to make the ultimate brunch for us.

Pastrami Salmon w. Herb Pancakes

Courtesy of Chef David Burke, Culinary Partner, ESquared Hospitality

Ingredients

  • 1 side salmon, about 2 to 2 ½ pounds, skin and bones removed
  • 1 cup coarse of Kosher salt
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 2 bunches fresh coriander
  • 1 bunch fresh, Italian parsley
  • ½ pound shallot, peeled
  • ½ cup molasses
  • 2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 5 bay leaves
  • 4 tbs paprika
  • 4 tbs ground coriander seed
  • 4 tbs fresh ground black pepper
  • 4 ts cracked pepper

Preparation

1. Place salmon on platter. Combine salt and sugar. Mix well and coat both sides of salmon with salt mixture

2. Combine coriander, parsley, and shallots in food processor and puree

3. Coat both sides of salmon with puree

4. Refridgerate salmon for two to three days

5. Scrape marinade from fish and discard

6. Dry fish with paper towels

7. Combine molasses, cayenne pepper and bay leaves in sauce pan. Bring to a boil and simmer for one minute

8. Allow molasses mixture to cool and using a brunch, paint fish on both sides with molasses mixture

9. Sprinkle paprika, coriander, ground black pepper, and cracked pepper on both sides of fish. Refrigerate salmon overnight.

10. To serve: Cut pastrami salmon into thin slices on the bias, or diagonally, and serve as desired

Herb pancakes recipe

Ingredients

  • 3⁄4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 1⁄4 tsp baking powder
  • 1⁄2 tsp salt
  • 1⁄2 cup milk
  • 3 tbs butter, melted
  • 1 egg
  • 1 ½ tsp fresh chives, minced
  • 1 ½ tsp fresh tarragon, chopped
  • 1 ½ tsp fresh parsley, chopped

Preparation

1. Add flour,baking powder and salt into bowl and mix.

2. Add milk, melted butter, egg and fresh herbs and mix until smooth.

3. Heat pan or griddle and pour batter into individual rounds (about half the size of regular pancakes), working in batches.

4. Cook until golden brown on each side (about 2 minutes) and transfer to serving platter.

6. Top pancakes with pastrami salmon.

Peanut Butter French Toast Waffle with Brandied Fruit Syrup

Courtesy of Chef David Burke, Culinary Partner, ESquared Hospitality

French Toast Waffle Ingredients

  • 2 tbs peanut butter
  • 4 slices white or wheat bread
  • 2 servings waffle mix
  • 4 eggs
  • ½ tsp cinnamon
  • 1 cup milk
  • Powdered sugar
  • Whipped cream
  • Edible flecks of Gold and/or silver leaf
  • Shaved chocolate (milk or dark)

Preparation

1. Make a peanut butter sandwich

2. Dip the sandwich in standard French toast batter until well coated

3. Put the sandwich into a heated waffle maker and close. Once cooked and golden brown, remove and transfer to serving area

4. Top the waffle with the heated maple syrup (see recipe), whipped cream, powdered sugar, gold flecks and shaved chocolate

Brandied Fruit Syrup Ingredients

  • ½ cup maple syrup
  • ½ cup grape jelly
  • ½ cup orange juice
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 6 sliced strawberries
  • 6 red grapes cut in half
  • 1 banana diced

Preparation

1. In a sauce pan, heat the maple syrup and jelly

2. Once hot, add diced bananas, strawberries and grapes and bring to a boil


Available for Takeout, too

David Burke Tavern Wines ToGo

SPARKLING

011 Scharffenberger, Brut, Mendocino, CA, NV 64.
013 Nicolas Feuillatte, Brut Reserve, Chouilly, France, NV 84.
000 Ruggeri, Prosecco, Italy, NV 60.
000 Conundrum, Blanc de Blanc, Healdsburg, CA, 2017 75.
000 Frerejean Freres, Premier Cru Brut, France, NV 100.
008 Henriot, Blanc de Blancs, NV 98.
002 Dom Ruinart, Reims, Rosé, NV 200.
004 Lanson Champagne Brut, France, NV 130.
009 Drappier Brut Nature, NV 140.
006 Veuve Cliquot, Brut, NV 175.
007 Veuve Cliquot, Brut Rosé, NV 180.

CHARDONNAY

California
100 Jordan, Russian River Valley, Ca, 2016 90.
101 Stags Leap ‘Karia’, Napa Valley, 2017 85.
110 Argot, Estate Vineyard, Bennet Valley, 2014 104.
113 Austerity, Central Coast, CA, 2016 65.
130 Flowers, Sonoma Coast, 2016 120.
131 Flowers, Camp Meeting Ridge, 2014 240.
111 Blindfold by The Prisoner, California, 2016 85.
134 Mer Soleil, Santa Lucia Highlands, Monterey, 2017 75.
103 Far Niente, Napa Valley, 2017 200.
France
129 William Fevre Chablis, 2018 95.
000 Domaine du Mas Des Tines, La Croix des Batilles, 2017 70.
140 Joseph Drouhin Puligny Montrachet, 2017 130.
119 Meursault, Les Charmes, Louis Baisinbert 1er Cru, 2014 250.
141 Meursault Genevrieres, Bouchard 1er Cru, 2013 275.
143 Saint-Aubin 1er Cru, “En Remilly”, 2016 125.
000 Sancerre, Bernard Reverdy, France, 2018 75.
World
301 Planeta, Sicily, Italy, 2017 90.
311 Penfolds, Bin 311, Tumbarumba, Australia, 2013 70.

SAUVIGNON BLANC

America
000 Shannon by Seamus, Russian River Valley, CA, 2015 70.
109 Stag’s Leap “Aveta”, Napa Valley, CA, 2017 80.
120 Eisele Vineyard, Araujo Estate, Napa Valley, CA, 2013 275.
132 Emollo, Napa Valley, CA, 2016 75.
131 Illumination, Napa Valley, CA, 2016 130.

OTHER WHITE

302 Pinot Grigio, Livio Felluga, Fruilani, Italy, 2017 65.
310 Vinho Verde, Quinta de Azevedo, Portugal, 2016 50.

OTHER REDS

US
432 Saldo, Zinfandel, 2017 95.
433 Seamus, Red Wine, Sonoma, CA, 2013 80.
428 The Prisoner, Red Blend, Napa Valley, CA, 2018 140.
952 Quintessa Red, Napa County, Rutherford, 2015 350.

World
000 Malbec, Sophenia, Mendoza, Argentina, 2017 65.
000 Cotes-du-Rhone, Perrin Reserve, Rhone, France, 2017 65.
811 Cabernet Sauvignon, Barossa Valley Estate, Australia, 2017 75.
812 Shiraz, E&E, Barossa Valley Estate, Australia, 2014 135.

PINOT NOIR

California & Oregon

000 Whoa Nelly, Willamette Valley, Or, 2017 65.
408 Row Eleven, Vinas 3, Napa, CA, 2016 70.
421 Domaine Serene, Evanstad Reserve, Williamette Valley, 2015 200.
420 Valerie’s Vineyard, Carneros, CA, 2016 85.
448 Domaine Drouhin, Dundee Hills, Oregon, 2016 98.
401 Emeritus, Hallberg Ranch, Russian River Valley, CA, 2016 110.
405 Peter Michael, Ma Denseuse, Sonoma County, 2014 240.
424 Ryan Cochrane, Fiddlestix Vineyard Santa Rita, CA, 2015 115.
421 Mer Soleil, Santa Lucia Highlands, Monterey, 2017 75.

Burgundy, France

510 Chateau de Rully, Antonin Rodet, Côte Chalonnaise, 2015 65.
519 Nuits-Saint-Georges Les Cailles, Bouchard Pere & Fils, 2013 240.
520 Chambolle-Musigny, Bouchard, Côte de Nuits, 2012 230.
526 Chateau de Beaune, Vigne de L’Enfant Jésus, 2010 250.
527 Vosne-Romanee, Joseph Drouhin, 2016 180.
512 Volnay, Vincent Girardin, 2016 125.

MERLOT / MERLOT BLENDS

455 Decoy, Sonoma County, CA, 2017 80.
461 Seven Hills, Walla Walla Valley, 2014 100.
462 Thorn, The Prisoner, Napa Valley, 2015 110.

CABERNET SAUVIGNON

452 Stag’s Leap, ‘Artemis’, Napa Valley, 2017 150.
414 St. Supery, Napa Valley, 2016 94.
000 Decoy, Sonoma County, CA, 2017 80.
411 Jordan, Alexander Valley, 2015 160.
412 Double Diamond, Oakville, CA, 2016 175.
451 Cuttings, The Prisoner, Napa Valley, CA 2017 138.
415 Seamus, Attwood Ranch, Russian River Valley, CA, 2014 80.
459 Rodney Strong ‘Alexander’s Crown’, Alexander Valley, 2013 190.
412 Silver Oak, Alexander Valley, CA, 2015 175.

Bordeaux, France

000 Château Brande-Bergere, Bordeaux, 2014 75.
619 Château de Come, St. Estephe, 2012 105.
616 Château Tour Sieujean, Pauillac, 2015 110.
617 Aromes de Pavie, Saint-Emilion Grand Cru, 2016 330.
618 Fluer de Pedesclaux, Pauillac, 2011 80.
621 Château Pavie de Luze, Margaux, 2016 100.
622 Pavillon de Leoville Poyferre, St. Julien, 2016 135.
620 Château Carbonnieux Pessac-Leognan, 2016 130.
616 Château de Pressac, Saint-Emilion, 2007 200.
614 Château Prieure-Lichine, GrandCru Chasse, Margaux 2010 200.

ITALIAN REDS

000 Sangiovese, “The Flying Piggy” Riserva, Tuscany, 2015 75.
730 Brunello di Montalcino, Caparzo Riserva, 2012 180.
730 Brunello di Montalcino, Caparzo Riserva, 2013 180.
740 Ruffino, Chiani Classico, Riserva Ducale oro 2014 110.
741 Bertani, Amarone della Valpolicella, 2008 245.
733 Frescobaldi, Mormoreto, Tuscany, 2013 160.


Watch the video: Chef David Burkes Duck Recipe (January 2022).