Traditional recipes

Lasagna with Turkey Sausage Bolognese

Lasagna with Turkey Sausage Bolognese

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon fennel seeds, crushed in spice mill or in mortar with pestle
  • 1 pound spicy Italian turkey sausages, casings removed
  • 3 large garlic cloves, pressed
  • 5 cups crushed tomatoes with added puree (from two 28-ounce cans)
  • 1 cup chopped fresh basil, divided
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh oregano
  • 1 15-ounce container whole-milk ricotta cheese
  • 3 cups (packed) coarsely grated whole-milk mozzarella cheese (12 ounces)
  • 1 1/4 cups freshly grated Parmesan cheese, divided
  • 16 6 1/2x3 1/4-inch no-boil lasagna noodles

Recipe Preparation

  • Heat oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add onions, carrot, and fennel seeds; sauté 5 minutes. Add sausage and garlic; sauté until sausage is cooked through, breaking into pieces, 8 to 10 minutes. Add wine; boil 1 minute. Add tomatoes, 1/2 cup basil, and oregano. Bring to boil. Reduce heat; simmer until sauce thickens, about 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

  • Combine ricotta, mozzarella, 1 cup Parmesan, and 1/2 cup basil in medium bowl; stir to blend. Season with pepper. DO AHEAD Sauce and cheese mixture can be made 1 day ahead. Cover separately; chill.

  • Place noodles in large bowl; cover with hot water. Soak until pliable, separating occasionally, about 30 minutes. Drain well.

  • Preheat oven to 375°F. Spread 1 cup sauce over bottom of 13x9x2-inch glass baking dish. Cover with 4 noodles, arranging crosswise. Drop 1/4 of cheese mixture over by tablespoonfuls; spread out. Top with 1 cup sauce, then 4 noodles and 1/3 of remaining cheese mixture. Repeat 2 more times with 1 cup sauce, 4 noodles, and 1/2 of cheese mixture. Spread any remaining sauce over. Sprinkle with 1/4 cup Parmesan.

  • Bake lasagna uncovered until heated through and puffed, about 50 minutes. Let stand 10 to 15 minutes and serve.

Nutritional Content

One serving contains: Calories (kcal) 508.5 %Calories from Fat 42.8 Fat (g) 24.2 Saturated Fat (g) 11.2 Cholesterol (mg) 81.2 Carbohydrates (g) 41.4 Dietary Fiber (g) 5.2 Total Sugars (g) 5.9 Net Carbs (g) 36.2 Protein (g) 32.3 Sodium (mg) 1221.2Reviews Section

Best Turkey Lasagna

This is our go-to lasagna, made with a meat sauce that has a combo of ground turkey and turkey sausage in the sauce. It will never let you down.

What is it about lasagna? My husband says that when he eats a really good lasagna it tickles the back of his throat (I smile and nod, he’s a very nice man). But let’s face the reality of lasagna together: it always TAKES MUCH MORE TIME THAN YOU THOUGHT IT WOULD. But it’s quite similar to childbirth: the lasagna is so delicious and charming that you forgot all about the pain you subjected yourself to bringing it into the world. You might even make another. Maybe even two.


Meat Lasagna Recipe

Let one of our classic tomato sauces be the base for a homemade lasagna like no other. Wide noodles are layered with three meats, ricotta, mozzarella, and pecorino cheeses and baked until bubbly. It’s easier than it looks, and everyone will find room for seconds.

Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat.

Add ground meats, salt, and pepper.

Saute meat until browned, about 10 minutes.

Using a slotted spoon, remove the meat from the pan and set aside.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the lasagna noodles and cook until al dente, about 10 to 12 minutes.

Drain and lay noodles on paper towels and pat dry.

Combine the ricotta, 1 cup of grated cheese, eggs, salt and pepper, and 1 tablespoon of parsley in a large mixing bowl. Set aside. Preheat oven to 375°F.

Lightly cover the bottom of an 11 x 16-inch baking dish with Rao’s Homemade® Marinara or Rao’s Homemade® Tomato Basil Sauce.

Arrange a slightly overlapping layer of lasagna noodles to cover the bottom of the dish.

Dot the lasagna noodles with large spoonfuls of the ricotta mixture and ground meats, spread.

Add some shredded mozzarella, and parmesan cheese.

Layer the second row of lasagna noodles, more sauce, ricotta cheese, ground meats, mozzarella cheese and a sprinkle of parmesan.

Repeat with one more layer of noodles, sauce, mozzarella cheese, and parmesan cheese.

Cover the dish with aluminum foil and bake until tile cheese is melted and the bubbly, about 45 minutes.

Remove the foil and bake until tile top layer is lightly browned, about 10 to 15 minutes.


Recipe Summary

  • 9 whole-wheat lasagna noodles
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • ½ cup chopped onion
  • 1 pound ground turkey breast
  • 3 cups tomato sauce
  • ½ cup sliced fresh mushrooms
  • 3 tablespoons Italian seasoning
  • ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon garlic powder
  • 6 cups chopped fresh spinach
  • 2 cups fat-free ricotta cheese
  • ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese

Preheat an oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).

Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Cook lasagna noodles in boiling water for 8 to 10 minutes. Drain noodles, and rinse with cold water.

Heat the olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Stir in the onion cook and stir until the onion has softened and turned translucent, about 2 minutes. Add ground turkey and cook 5 to 7 minutes more, stirring to break up any large chunks of meat. Stir in tomato sauce, mushrooms, Italian seasoning, black pepper, and garlic powder. Simmer for 2 minutes and season to taste.

Combine spinach, ricotta, and nutmeg in a large bowl.

To assemble, arrange 3 noodles lengthwise in the bottom of a greased 9x13 inch baking dish. Spread with 1/3 the ricotta mixture, 1/3 of the turkey mixture, and 1/3 of the mozzarella. Repeat layers, ending with remaining mozzarella. Bake in preheated oven for 25 minutes. Cool for 5 minutes before serving.


Homemade lasagna

I've been watching a lot of cooking shows during COVID and love lasagna. I was just curious as to if it's worth it to make it homemade or the frozen kind work just as well. I usually buy stouffer's lasagna when I get it frozen.

I love making lasagne and cannelloni.

They're very easy to make and are delicious.

Homemade lasagna is way better than stouffer’s. Use a recipe with a beschamel instead of ricotta and make a slow cooked ragout. So delicious and worth it.

Eh. I'd rather just buy the Stouffers.

At Turkey Hill, we grow our own lasagna.

I find is the secret of making good lasagne is getting really thin sheets of lasagna.

Why are the only two options home or frozen? Do they not have restaurants where you live OP?

yes, but I don't usually get lasagna at a restaurant

Why don’t you have the servants make it for you?

start making homemade sauce.

When you have a sauce you love, then just buy high quality ingredients (cheese, ricotta, olive oil).

I refused to pay them for doing half ass job and fired them

Costco has a lasagna ravioli Bolognese that I love!

frozen lasagne always has noodles that are too thick.

You can fix that r7. Just saying, surely there is some restaurant around you where you could pick up some nice lasagna to quell your craving.

To me I don't want to cook an entire lasagna when I live alone. It's too much.

Chef John's Pancake Lasagna for One.

I haven't made it but his recipes are generally very good.

Also, he's a real chef not just some YTer.

R12 - best part is at 06:00 - "It's working!" That chick is as familiar with a kitchen as I am with a private jet.

2.) Make your own tomato sauce.

3.) Alternate each row with ground meat and ricotta/mozarella combo.

4.) Lightly sprinkle mozarella over the top to help create your crust.

You can alternate your ground meat mix with a pound of Jones sausage cubed if you want to be daring.

There's recipes online for one pan options. You just use one pan to fry up your meat or vegetarian filling, then you mix through sheets of pasta - so it's less of a layered lasanga but close enough. You still do your layers of cheese and you can put in sour cream in lieu of the white sauce.

You then put pan in oven for final cooking.

Making your own is exponentially better than anything you can buy frozen (if you make it right). I like to use Chef John's Bolognese recipe for the sauce, fresh pasta, and a béchamel sauce. It's time consuming, but not that much active work. It also freezes really well, so make it, freeze what you don't eat, and next time you have a craving for it, you can defrost some good stuff rather than that garbage Stouffers shite.

A poster in a previous lasagne thread mentioned using cabbage leaves instead of lasagne noodles. I saw a recipe for something like that in one of Marcella Hazan's books. Definitely want to try it. Is more like ground pork that is mildly seasoned and spread thinly between layers of cabbage leaves than a lasagne though.

I will try it with a white sauce flavoured with bay leaves instead of nutmeg.

Have also always wanted to try a lasagne with ham and mushrooms. Always talk about it. Still have to do it.

OP where do you live that you think NOW would be a great time to fire up the oven and bake anything? Australia?

if you can get some rectangular lock'n'lock borosilicate glass containers, you can bake mini lasagna and cover/freeze them in large portion sizes (half for a meal, unless you want to pig out). (Or line aluminum loaf pans with parchment paper).

Or you can just bake them in a standard pan and then cut them when cool and wrap them in saran wrap, as lasagne shouldn't have sauce oozing out of it by the cupful and will cut easily.

I buy the Costco one, because it really is good. But I cut it into squares. I get abut 6 squares out of one casserole. I put them in baggies and freeze them. It's so easy to put one serving into an oven safe dish and into my toaster oven to cook, while I make a salad. 50 minutes on 375. I cover it loosely with tin foil, and it's perfect.

Don't wrap it in saran wrap. it will get mushy. If you bake a whole casserole of lasagna, let it cool to room temp. Then put it into you fridge covered loosely with tinfoil. After it's been in there for a few hours and has a chance to set, then cut it up into serving sized squares, put it into individual freeze bags and freeze it. I do it all the time.

It is really a LOT of work. The only way I've made it 'worth it" is having friends over, get a bit tipsy and do it together. Otherwise, find a good Italian place and they will sell you a pan for less than what you would pay for a: making it from scratch, and b: buying it as a sit down customer.

I learned this about pizza dough too. Most places will give you a gorgeous ball of dough for only a couple of bucks.

r27 That's a great tip about pizza dough. And for an extra couple of bucks, they'll actually make you a pizza.

Lasagna is tricky in that is it really worth the cost of all the ingredients and effort if you're just making it for yourself? Yes you can freeze the rest of it, but what also freezes well - Stouffer's lasagna.

If I'm going to splurge while out grocery shopping, I'd rather spend it on things like Ribeye steaks.

I have never heard of using sour cream in lasagna. It could be good, but not very authentic. Neither is cottage cheese good in lasagna. My Italian grandmother used ricotta cheese. I like this much better than béchamel sauce. The savory, tangy sauce needs the ricotta as a contrast, if that makes sense. Meat was either ground beef, or no meat. I use lean ground beef and Italian sausage. My great grandmother would add hard boiled eggs. I do not recommend using the no boil lasagne noodles. They always come out pasty and not good. Go ahead and do a little extra work and use regular lasagne noodles. Homemade sauce is always the best, but jarred works in a pinch. However you make it, I am sure your lasagna will turn out delicious. Homemade is always better than frozen. Now I am VERY hungry. When is dinner?

I like the no boil noodles. I usually just buy the regular boil noodles and then put them in dry. The come out the same.

If I make lasagna, I usually do it in more than one day. One day I make the bolognese. Then freeze or refrigerate it. And another day, make the lasagna.

And I dozens of small toaster oven size pans that I make about 4-5 lasagnas at a time in. Just assemble and then freeze them. Bake the frozen ones whenever I want.

I just saw a video last night that has had me craving lasagna all day. It's a Youtube channel called Pasta Grannies. This lady made her lasagna noodles so thin that she gets 7 layers in a small pan! I got some lasagna for dinner tonight but it's not the same I think I am going to have to make this recipe.

Look. It really isn't that complicated. The most important thing is the sauce. Make you sauce, a meat sauce or a Bolognese sauce. If you go with Bolognese it is hade but so worth it. Once the sauce is made, you're ready. You use Ricotta cheese, and use two eggs (raw) to 3-4 pounds and finely grated Parmesan and Pecorino Romano mixed. Salt, pepper, chopped parsley. Mix it all together in a bowl. But MAKE SURE YOU DRAIN THE RICOTTA BEFORE YOU BEGIN. Get rid of the excess water.

Par boil your lasagna noodles, then assemble. Put it in a 350 oven for about 45 -55 minutes loosely covered by tin foil. Don't serve it right away. It needs to east for about 15 -20 minutes before you serve it.

[quote] If you go with Bolognese it is hade but so worth it.

It's not *hard,* it's just time consuming as you have to let all the layers reduce.

When I want to go all out, I make my own pasta, which I interleave with Bolognese, besciamella, and Parmigiano-Reggiano, alla Marcella Hazan.

When I don't want to bother, or want to go meatless, I use the recipe posted below, from Lucinda Scala Quinn @ marthastewart.com

Another half-measure is to make the Bolognese, the besciamella, and the parm, but mix them with box pasta, usually cavatappi.

If I'm too lazy to do any of these things, I go out for lasagne. Locally (Pittsburgh), Piccolo Forno's is my favorite, but among chain restaurants, I like Bravo's version. It's better by far than a lot of what's available locally.

I can imagine how carefully R36 pronounces “besciamella” as she describes her recipe.

My husbear occasionally makes this lasagna recipe, including the homemade noodles. It is sublimely good.

It's balsamella in the book, R37.

If you are in Louisiana you should try the cajun ninja lasagna recipe. So yummy.

There are certain things that will always taste better when homemade, and that includes lasagna and chocolate chip cookies. Stouffers is kind of gross actually.

I'm weird. I don't care for the heavy lasagna or the stuffed shells. I do love the piccatas and other lemon/wine based sauces.

Lasagna roll-ups - that's the ticket!

Lasagna is one of the very few dishes that taste even better the day after.

Instead of besciamella, make sausage gravy. Layer the noodles with scrambled eggs. And wa-la! breakfast lasagna.

I would leave out the sausage.

Make sure you like the sauce first. Practice and adjust to your taste buds.

You can blend parsley and spinach in the ricotta mixture. I prefer this way. I prefer finely chopped.

Buy high quality Cheeses and Olive Oil.

Can we discuss Joy Behar's kitchen? She has great taste. This kitchen is timeless, a classic.

R48, a millionaire has a great kitchen! I’ll alert the media.

I will get called a frau, and will be flamed and shamed for this, but if you're not particularly interested in investing the time in creating a homemade, from-scratch lasagna, this slow cooker recipe is surprisingly good. I was always afraid of putting pasta in the slow cooker, but I'll be damned if this didn't turn out very well. It definitely beats a Stouffer's.

It isn't the only one I make, but it's so fucking good on those autumn & winter evenings when I 've been doing yard work, and come in cold and tired. I take a hot relaxing shower, put on the pajamas, and tuck in. I've been making it for years.

I DO recommend at least pulling together a simple homemade sauce. But it isn't absolutely necessary.

I'm saving that r50 since you are personally raving about it.

Joy Behar ruined it by putting it in an aluminum foil pan. With tomato sauce? Never! I've made lasagna for people (births, deaths) and they give me the pan back, eventually. If they don't, big deal, I'm out a $20 pan. I think Joy can afford to give a dish away. I hate eating any food out of an aluminum container - always taste the metal, yuck.

As much of a purist as I can be, that Breakfast Lasagne at r46 doesn't sound half bad. If I were serving it to others, I might think of another name. breakfast casserole, perhaps. You could use the pancakes from Chef John's recipe in r15 instead of pasta.

WTF. 52 posts and no mention of Vegetable Lasagna. VEGETABLE FUCKING LASAGNA.

I don't like the taste of ricotta cheese.

[quote]I don't like the taste of ricotta cheese.

See one of the recipes above that uses bechamel, aka besciamella, balsamella.

Going to an Italian restaurant tonight. Haven't decided yet between lasagne and pizza w/oven-roasted roma tomatoes, caramelized red onion, kalamata olives, baby artichoke hearts, fresh arugula, and feta cheese.

This thread has me feeling like Garfield over here. I've been getting lasagna from all the restaurants around me the last few nights trying to find one that has 1) thin noodles with many layers and 2) besciamella instead of ricotta. The funny thing is I never used to eat lasagna ever! If I wanted something cheesy and layered I used to go with eggplant parmesan.


Lasagna with Turkey Sausage Bolognese Is Everything You Want From Comfort Food

Garfield was onto something: Lasagna might be one of the single best foods ever. It’s the ultimate comfort concoction, with its saucy layers of cheese and pasta, and—contrary to popular belief—you don’t have to be an Italian grandma to make it. You don’t even have to be Italian.

Whether you’re making your noodles from scratch in a classic Bolognese preparation, getting your kids to eat their veggies by packing it with squash and broccoli rabe, or even making it vegan and gluten-free, this one-tray dinner is sure to be a crowd-pleaser. Check out 9 other—but equally awesome—ways to make it in the slideshow.

LASAGNA WITH TURKEY SAUSAGE BOLOGNESE
Recipe by Rozanne Gold
Serves 8-10

Ingredients
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 cups chopped onions
1/2 cup diced carrot
1 tablespoon fennel seeds, crushed in spice mill or in mortar with pestle
1 pound spicy Italian turkey sausages, casings removed
3 large garlic cloves, pressed
1/2 cup dry white wine
5 cups crushed tomatoes with added puree (from two 28-ounce cans)
1 cup chopped fresh basil, divided
2 tablespoons chopped fresh oregano
1 15-ounce container whole-milk ricotta cheese
3 cups (packed) coarsely grated whole-milk mozzarella cheese
1 1/4 cups freshly grated Parmesan cheese, divided
16 6 1/2x3 1/4-inch no-boil lasagna noodles

Preparation
Heat oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add onions, carrot, and fennel seeds sauté 5 minutes. Add sausage and garlic sauté until sausage is cooked through, breaking into pieces, 8 to 10 minutes. Add wine boil 1 minute. Add tomatoes, 1/2 cup basil, and oregano. Bring to boil. Reduce heat simmer until sauce thickens, about 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

Combine ricotta, mozzarella, 1 cup Parmesan, and 1/2 cup basil in medium bowl stir to blend. Season with pepper. DO AHEAD Sauce and cheese mixture can be made 1 day ahead. Cover separately chill.

Place noodles in large bowl cover with hot water. Soak until pliable, separating occasionally, about 30 minutes. Drain well.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Spread 1 cup sauce over bottom of 13x9x2-inch glass baking dish. Cover with 4 noodles, arranging crosswise. Drop 1/4 of cheese mixture over by tablespoonfuls spread out. Top with 1 cup sauce, then 4 noodles and 1/3 of remaining cheese mixture. Repeat 2 more times with 1 cup sauce, 4 noodles, and 1/2 of cheese mixture. Spread any remaining sauce over. Sprinkle with 1/4 cup Parmesan.

Bake lasagna uncovered until heated through and puffed, about 50 minutes. Let stand 10 to 15 minutes and serve.


How to Freeze Lasagna: Two different ways

Another thing I absolutely love about this meal is that the lasagna is freezer friendly! There are two methods to freezing lasagna:

  1. Bake first, then freeze. You can either bake it first, then cool to room temperature, slice into servings, place in freezer safe containers and then freeze. Or you can bake it, bring to room temp, and then freeze the entire pan. Just make sure you double wrap it so the lasagna does not dry out. This is assuming you are freezing the entire pan. Once ready to reheat, thaw it out. Then bake, covered at 350 degrees F for 30-45 minutes or until heated through.
  2. Freeze before baking: To freeze before baking, simply assemble the lasagna as written in the instructions, then double wrap with plastic wrap and foil and freeze for up to 3 months. Once ready to bake, thaw out then bake according to instructions.

Personally I like to cook mine first, then freeze in individual portions, so I can take it out for meals or for lunch as needed. I just reheat my serving in the microwave. YUM.

I hope you love this recipe as much as we do. It’s great for parties and football season too. If you make it, be sure to tag #ambitiouskitchen on Instagram and/or leave a comment and rate the recipe below!

This recipe is part of my best of series, where I test and improve recipes to make them the ‘best ever’. Let me know which recipe you’d like me to make next!


What Side Dishes Go With Lasagna?

You really can’t go wrong with a side dish for lasagna. Some type of veggie, such as Roasted Garlic Green Beans or your favorite green salad is always a winner.

We love creamy Greek Cucumber Salad as it pairs amazingly with this carb-loaded comfort food. Kale Caesar Salad is a great option if you’re looking for something more traditional.

Or make this 5-minute Parmesan Arugula Kale Salad with Pine Nuts for an easy side.

If you try Ina Garten’s Lasagna Recipe, don’t forget to leave feedback and a rating.


Traditional Bolognese vs. My Version of Bolognese

A traditional bolognese is typically more meat than sauce and has a little cream added to it. So, this isn’t really an authentic sauce but more my version of a lightened up bolognese using ground turkey and turkey Italian sausage.

Regardless, it’s one of my favorite Italian sauce recipes and I’m confident that everyone you serve this too will lick their plate clean!

I know using ground turkey and turkey Italian sausage in a sauce recipe might seem a little weird especially if you’re a big Italian sauce fan. Trust me when I tell people I use turkey over beef for this meat sauce or for when I make meatballs, some of them don’t believe it can ever taste as good as using meat.

However, I’ve turned many skeptics!

I’ve lost count of the number of people who’ve tried this turkey bolognese sauce and asked me for the recipe afterward. The same thing happens with my turkey meatballs. So, don’t be afraid to lighten up your sauce recipes with ground turkey!


Quick & Easy Turkey Lasagna

Bake up this Quick & Easy Turkey Lasagna recipe with lean, sweet Italian turkey sausage and three kinds of cheese. Full of flavor, done in under 60 minutes, and super kid-friendly!

Serving Size

Ingredients

(19.5-ounce) package JENNIE-O® Lean Sweet Italian Turkey Sausage

(15-ounce) container ricotta cheese

cup grated Parmesan cheese

cups shredded mozzarella cheese, divided

Directions

Crumble turkey sausage into a large pre-heated saucepan discard casings. Cook over medium-high heat 5 to 7 minutes, breaking sausage into chunks and stirring frequently. Always cook turkey to well-done, 165°F. as measured by a meat thermometer.

Add spaghetti sauce bring to a boil. Reduce heat simmer uncovered 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Place 2 noodles on bottom of 9-inch square baking dish. Spread ¼ of sauce on noodles. Combine ricotta and Parmesan cheese spoon ⅓ of mixture over sauce. top with ⅓ cup mozzarella cheese. Repeat layering 2 more times and place last 2 noodles on top. Cover with remaining sauce.

Cover with foil bake 25 minutes or until noodles are tender and sauce is bubbly. Uncover top with remaining 1 cup mozzarella cheese. Return to oven bake 5 minutes or until cheese is melted. Let stand 5 minutes before serving.