Traditional recipes

Flommen Tsimmes Brisket

Flommen Tsimmes Brisket

You will need a saucepan large enough to hold the brisket.

Heat the oil in the pan and brown the brisket on both sides. Add the onions, potatoes, three-quarters of the prunes, and 2 teaspoons of salt. Cover with boiling water and half of the golden syrup. Bring to a boil, partially cover, then simmer until quite tender, at least 1 hour 15 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Take the meat out of the liquid and place in an ovenproof dish. Strain and reserve the liquid, and spoon the onion, potato, and prunes on top of the brisket. Pour enough liquid into the dish so that it comes halfway up the meat. Top with the remaining prunes and golden syrup. Sprinkle over ½ teaspoon of salt and plenty of pepper. Roast, uncovered, basting every 15 minutes or so until the meat is fork tender, 1 to 1½ hours.

To serve, sprinkle with the lemon juice.


Cybele Pascal

Tsimmes or Tzimmes (Yiddish for “mess” or “state of confusion”) is a traditional Jewish holiday dish made by stewing root vegetables with dried fruit or meat over low heat. It also happens to be a naturally allergen-free and gluten-free dish. This makes it a Rosh Hashanah go-to in my food allergic household. There is no reason to sacrifice rich tradition and great taste when you can still enjoy exotic and delectable dishes like this one. This simple recipe borrows heavily from traditional Jewish culinary history, with a nod to my great-grandmother Dora of Vilna, Lithuania – whose spoon you see pictured above.

My great-grandmother probably would have made a Brisket and a Tsimmes. But I’m a modern woman who’s short on time, so I prefer to make it all in one pot! Additionally, the sweet root vegetables and prunes really enhance the flavor of the brisket and tenderize it. Be sure to find a good quality cut of brisket, for optimal tenderness (read: not too lean!).

If you like, you can cook the brisket whole. I chose to cube it, since my kids prefer it this way. Cook the tsimmes until tender. You really can’t overcook brisket, as long as it’s in the sauce, and cooked at a low temperature. One other bonus to this recipe is it’s better a day or two after you cook it, so make it early, then reheat at 350°F.


Cybele Pascal

Tsimmes or Tzimmes (Yiddish for “mess” or “state of confusion”) is a traditional Jewish holiday dish made by stewing root vegetables with dried fruit or meat over low heat. It also happens to be a naturally allergen-free and gluten-free dish. This makes it a Rosh Hashanah go-to in my food allergic household. There is no reason to sacrifice rich tradition and great taste when you can still enjoy exotic and delectable dishes like this one. This simple recipe borrows heavily from traditional Jewish culinary history, with a nod to my great-grandmother Dora of Vilna, Lithuania – whose spoon you see pictured above.

My great-grandmother probably would have made a Brisket and a Tsimmes. But I’m a modern woman who’s short on time, so I prefer to make it all in one pot! Additionally, the sweet root vegetables and prunes really enhance the flavor of the brisket and tenderize it. Be sure to find a good quality cut of brisket, for optimal tenderness (read: not too lean!).

If you like, you can cook the brisket whole. I chose to cube it, since my kids prefer it this way. Cook the tsimmes until tender. You really can’t overcook brisket, as long as it’s in the sauce, and cooked at a low temperature. One other bonus to this recipe is it’s better a day or two after you cook it, so make it early, then reheat at 350°F.


Cybele Pascal

Tsimmes or Tzimmes (Yiddish for “mess” or “state of confusion”) is a traditional Jewish holiday dish made by stewing root vegetables with dried fruit or meat over low heat. It also happens to be a naturally allergen-free and gluten-free dish. This makes it a Rosh Hashanah go-to in my food allergic household. There is no reason to sacrifice rich tradition and great taste when you can still enjoy exotic and delectable dishes like this one. This simple recipe borrows heavily from traditional Jewish culinary history, with a nod to my great-grandmother Dora of Vilna, Lithuania – whose spoon you see pictured above.

My great-grandmother probably would have made a Brisket and a Tsimmes. But I’m a modern woman who’s short on time, so I prefer to make it all in one pot! Additionally, the sweet root vegetables and prunes really enhance the flavor of the brisket and tenderize it. Be sure to find a good quality cut of brisket, for optimal tenderness (read: not too lean!).

If you like, you can cook the brisket whole. I chose to cube it, since my kids prefer it this way. Cook the tsimmes until tender. You really can’t overcook brisket, as long as it’s in the sauce, and cooked at a low temperature. One other bonus to this recipe is it’s better a day or two after you cook it, so make it early, then reheat at 350°F.


Cybele Pascal

Tsimmes or Tzimmes (Yiddish for “mess” or “state of confusion”) is a traditional Jewish holiday dish made by stewing root vegetables with dried fruit or meat over low heat. It also happens to be a naturally allergen-free and gluten-free dish. This makes it a Rosh Hashanah go-to in my food allergic household. There is no reason to sacrifice rich tradition and great taste when you can still enjoy exotic and delectable dishes like this one. This simple recipe borrows heavily from traditional Jewish culinary history, with a nod to my great-grandmother Dora of Vilna, Lithuania – whose spoon you see pictured above.

My great-grandmother probably would have made a Brisket and a Tsimmes. But I’m a modern woman who’s short on time, so I prefer to make it all in one pot! Additionally, the sweet root vegetables and prunes really enhance the flavor of the brisket and tenderize it. Be sure to find a good quality cut of brisket, for optimal tenderness (read: not too lean!).

If you like, you can cook the brisket whole. I chose to cube it, since my kids prefer it this way. Cook the tsimmes until tender. You really can’t overcook brisket, as long as it’s in the sauce, and cooked at a low temperature. One other bonus to this recipe is it’s better a day or two after you cook it, so make it early, then reheat at 350°F.


Cybele Pascal

Tsimmes or Tzimmes (Yiddish for “mess” or “state of confusion”) is a traditional Jewish holiday dish made by stewing root vegetables with dried fruit or meat over low heat. It also happens to be a naturally allergen-free and gluten-free dish. This makes it a Rosh Hashanah go-to in my food allergic household. There is no reason to sacrifice rich tradition and great taste when you can still enjoy exotic and delectable dishes like this one. This simple recipe borrows heavily from traditional Jewish culinary history, with a nod to my great-grandmother Dora of Vilna, Lithuania – whose spoon you see pictured above.

My great-grandmother probably would have made a Brisket and a Tsimmes. But I’m a modern woman who’s short on time, so I prefer to make it all in one pot! Additionally, the sweet root vegetables and prunes really enhance the flavor of the brisket and tenderize it. Be sure to find a good quality cut of brisket, for optimal tenderness (read: not too lean!).

If you like, you can cook the brisket whole. I chose to cube it, since my kids prefer it this way. Cook the tsimmes until tender. You really can’t overcook brisket, as long as it’s in the sauce, and cooked at a low temperature. One other bonus to this recipe is it’s better a day or two after you cook it, so make it early, then reheat at 350°F.


Cybele Pascal

Tsimmes or Tzimmes (Yiddish for “mess” or “state of confusion”) is a traditional Jewish holiday dish made by stewing root vegetables with dried fruit or meat over low heat. It also happens to be a naturally allergen-free and gluten-free dish. This makes it a Rosh Hashanah go-to in my food allergic household. There is no reason to sacrifice rich tradition and great taste when you can still enjoy exotic and delectable dishes like this one. This simple recipe borrows heavily from traditional Jewish culinary history, with a nod to my great-grandmother Dora of Vilna, Lithuania – whose spoon you see pictured above.

My great-grandmother probably would have made a Brisket and a Tsimmes. But I’m a modern woman who’s short on time, so I prefer to make it all in one pot! Additionally, the sweet root vegetables and prunes really enhance the flavor of the brisket and tenderize it. Be sure to find a good quality cut of brisket, for optimal tenderness (read: not too lean!).

If you like, you can cook the brisket whole. I chose to cube it, since my kids prefer it this way. Cook the tsimmes until tender. You really can’t overcook brisket, as long as it’s in the sauce, and cooked at a low temperature. One other bonus to this recipe is it’s better a day or two after you cook it, so make it early, then reheat at 350°F.


Cybele Pascal

Tsimmes or Tzimmes (Yiddish for “mess” or “state of confusion”) is a traditional Jewish holiday dish made by stewing root vegetables with dried fruit or meat over low heat. It also happens to be a naturally allergen-free and gluten-free dish. This makes it a Rosh Hashanah go-to in my food allergic household. There is no reason to sacrifice rich tradition and great taste when you can still enjoy exotic and delectable dishes like this one. This simple recipe borrows heavily from traditional Jewish culinary history, with a nod to my great-grandmother Dora of Vilna, Lithuania – whose spoon you see pictured above.

My great-grandmother probably would have made a Brisket and a Tsimmes. But I’m a modern woman who’s short on time, so I prefer to make it all in one pot! Additionally, the sweet root vegetables and prunes really enhance the flavor of the brisket and tenderize it. Be sure to find a good quality cut of brisket, for optimal tenderness (read: not too lean!).

If you like, you can cook the brisket whole. I chose to cube it, since my kids prefer it this way. Cook the tsimmes until tender. You really can’t overcook brisket, as long as it’s in the sauce, and cooked at a low temperature. One other bonus to this recipe is it’s better a day or two after you cook it, so make it early, then reheat at 350°F.


Cybele Pascal

Tsimmes or Tzimmes (Yiddish for “mess” or “state of confusion”) is a traditional Jewish holiday dish made by stewing root vegetables with dried fruit or meat over low heat. It also happens to be a naturally allergen-free and gluten-free dish. This makes it a Rosh Hashanah go-to in my food allergic household. There is no reason to sacrifice rich tradition and great taste when you can still enjoy exotic and delectable dishes like this one. This simple recipe borrows heavily from traditional Jewish culinary history, with a nod to my great-grandmother Dora of Vilna, Lithuania – whose spoon you see pictured above.

My great-grandmother probably would have made a Brisket and a Tsimmes. But I’m a modern woman who’s short on time, so I prefer to make it all in one pot! Additionally, the sweet root vegetables and prunes really enhance the flavor of the brisket and tenderize it. Be sure to find a good quality cut of brisket, for optimal tenderness (read: not too lean!).

If you like, you can cook the brisket whole. I chose to cube it, since my kids prefer it this way. Cook the tsimmes until tender. You really can’t overcook brisket, as long as it’s in the sauce, and cooked at a low temperature. One other bonus to this recipe is it’s better a day or two after you cook it, so make it early, then reheat at 350°F.


Cybele Pascal

Tsimmes or Tzimmes (Yiddish for “mess” or “state of confusion”) is a traditional Jewish holiday dish made by stewing root vegetables with dried fruit or meat over low heat. It also happens to be a naturally allergen-free and gluten-free dish. This makes it a Rosh Hashanah go-to in my food allergic household. There is no reason to sacrifice rich tradition and great taste when you can still enjoy exotic and delectable dishes like this one. This simple recipe borrows heavily from traditional Jewish culinary history, with a nod to my great-grandmother Dora of Vilna, Lithuania – whose spoon you see pictured above.

My great-grandmother probably would have made a Brisket and a Tsimmes. But I’m a modern woman who’s short on time, so I prefer to make it all in one pot! Additionally, the sweet root vegetables and prunes really enhance the flavor of the brisket and tenderize it. Be sure to find a good quality cut of brisket, for optimal tenderness (read: not too lean!).

If you like, you can cook the brisket whole. I chose to cube it, since my kids prefer it this way. Cook the tsimmes until tender. You really can’t overcook brisket, as long as it’s in the sauce, and cooked at a low temperature. One other bonus to this recipe is it’s better a day or two after you cook it, so make it early, then reheat at 350°F.


Cybele Pascal

Tsimmes or Tzimmes (Yiddish for “mess” or “state of confusion”) is a traditional Jewish holiday dish made by stewing root vegetables with dried fruit or meat over low heat. It also happens to be a naturally allergen-free and gluten-free dish. This makes it a Rosh Hashanah go-to in my food allergic household. There is no reason to sacrifice rich tradition and great taste when you can still enjoy exotic and delectable dishes like this one. This simple recipe borrows heavily from traditional Jewish culinary history, with a nod to my great-grandmother Dora of Vilna, Lithuania – whose spoon you see pictured above.

My great-grandmother probably would have made a Brisket and a Tsimmes. But I’m a modern woman who’s short on time, so I prefer to make it all in one pot! Additionally, the sweet root vegetables and prunes really enhance the flavor of the brisket and tenderize it. Be sure to find a good quality cut of brisket, for optimal tenderness (read: not too lean!).

If you like, you can cook the brisket whole. I chose to cube it, since my kids prefer it this way. Cook the tsimmes until tender. You really can’t overcook brisket, as long as it’s in the sauce, and cooked at a low temperature. One other bonus to this recipe is it’s better a day or two after you cook it, so make it early, then reheat at 350°F.